Posted by: rjones34 | April 17, 2014

THE BIG ONE

This article is not meant to scare anyone, but rather to motivate people to be prepared. I believe that this earthquake will happen sometime soon and there is not nearly enough people that are prepared for it! I mean at least have some food and water stored away and a few flashlights people! Take 2 hours this coming Saturday and follow a few of the suggestions that they have in this article. Image

http://www.ksl.com/?sid=29516946&nid=148&fm=home_page&s_cid=toppick4

Image

Doing the small things really do add up when preparing for the big one!

 

WEST JORDAN — The State of Utah is about to embark on its latest renewal of a grim tradition: preparing for the “big one ” with The Great Utah ShakeOut.

Experts say that preparation is incredibly important to improving the chances of surviving a major earthquake.

Emergency crews regularly prepare for a 7.0-magnitude quake, and they have an idea of how bad the Wasatch Front would look in the event of one.

“I don’t want to scare people, but honestly I look at the pictures from Haiti,” said Bill Brass, project manager of Utah Task Force 1, the state’s urban search and rescue response team that has aided in disasters across the country.

Brass then thinks about his older home in Sugar House, built with un-reinforced masonry, and how it would hold up in a quake like the 7.3-magnitude monster that leveled much of Haiti in 2010

Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=29516946#VpRZOZQo37Ij9sif.99

WEST JORDAN — The State of Utah is about to embark on its latest renewal of a grim tradition: preparing for the “big one ” with The Great Utah ShakeOut.

Experts say that preparation is incredibly important to improving the chances of surviving a major earthquake.

Emergency crews regularly prepare for a 7.0-magnitude quake, and they have an idea of how bad the Wasatch Front would look in the event of one.

“I don’t want to scare people, but honestly I look at the pictures from Haiti,” said Bill Brass, project manager of Utah Task Force 1, the state’s urban search and rescue response team that has aided in disasters across the country.

Brass then thinks about his older home in Sugar House, built with un-reinforced masonry, and how it would hold up in a quake like the 7.3-magnitude monster that leveled much of Haiti in 2010.

“Chances are excellent that house will not survive a 7.0 earthquake,” Brass said.

Earthquake preparations you may not have concidered
by Jed Boal

Many Utahns already have a 72-hour kit and a good emergency plan for family members in the event of an earthquake. But Joe Dougherty with the Utah Division of Emergency Management suggests some preparations you may not have considered.

Communication

If an earthquake rattles the Wasatch Front, you need to communicate with family right away. The best way to do so is to send a text. If everyone tries to call, that can jam up the phone lines.

Household concerns

Have an emergency toilet. You might not be able to use your toilet after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake, which would likely damage sewer and water lines. Buy a 5-gallon bucket and a special toilet seat lid to snap on top. Line the bucket with a garbage bag and throw in kitty litter between each use to reduce odors.

Secure your water heater. If your water heater gets knocked over in an earthquake and starts a fire, you’ve got another problem on your hands. Strapping the water heater to the wall will not only prevent a second disaster, but you can also use all the fresh water inside.

Conduct a “home hazard hunt.” This means going through your house and identifying heaving things that might fall down in an earthquake, and then finding a way to secure them.

Pets

A 72-hour emergency kit for your pet is important. Make sure it includes extra food, an unbreakable bowl, and a spare leash.

Email: jboal@ksl.com

Historic streets in Sugar House, the Avenues and other neighborhoods in the Salt Lake Valley’s northeast corner are lined with those same types of homes.

“We are going to have scores of people trapped, and for long periods of time,” Brass said. “Some of those people we will never be able to get to.”

Brass said a 7.0-magnitude earthquake would likely result in a disruption to water and power that could go on for weeks or longer. The disaster would draw a response from across the country, he said, but even that may not be enough.

“Quite honestly, this is a fact we don’t like to tell a lot of people – there are not enough teams like ours in the nation to sustain Utah in the event of a 7.0 earthquake or greater,” Brass said.

At the University of Utah, seismologist Katherine Whidden said she doesn’t believe devastation in the Salt Lake Valley would approach the level it did in Haiti, but she also acknowledged it would be plenty bad.

“The problem we have here is that all the population is right on top of the fault,” Whidden said.

A 7.0-magnitude earthquake would likely create a 5- to 10-foot rift along the responsible fault line.

“There could be a surface rupture – in the middle of the city,” Whidden said.

The Wasatch Fault is divided into 10 segments, and any of those segments could deliver that strong of a quake.

They happen every 300 years, Whidden said, and Utah hasn’t had a 7.0-magnitude earthquake or larger in about 300 years.

“We’re not exactly overdue,” Whidden said. “But we’re about due for a big earthquake.”

Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=29516946#VpRZOZQo37Ij9sif.99

Earthquake preparations you may not have concidered
by Jed Boal

Many Utahns already have a 72-hour kit and a good emergency plan for family members in the event of an earthquake. But Joe Dougherty with the Utah Division of Emergency Management suggests some preparations you may not have considered.

Communication

If an earthquake rattles the Wasatch Front, you need to communicate with family right away. The best way to do so is to send a text. If everyone tries to call, that can jam up the phone lines.

Household concerns

Have an emergency toilet. You might not be able to use your toilet after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake, which would likely damage sewer and water lines. Buy a 5-gallon bucket and a special toilet seat lid to snap on top. Line the bucket with a garbage bag and throw in kitty litter between each use to reduce odors.

Secure your water heater. If your water heater gets knocked over in an earthquake and starts a fire, you’ve got another problem on your hands. Strapping the water heater to the wall will not only prevent a second disaster, but you can also use all the fresh water inside.

Conduct a “home hazard hunt.” This means going through your house and identifying heaving things that might fall down in an earthquake, and then finding a way to secure them.

Pets

A 72-hour emergency kit for your pet is important. Make sure it includes extra food, an unbreakable bowl, and a spare leash.

Email: jboal@ksl.com

Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=29516946#VpRZOZQo37Ij9sif.99

Earthquake preparations you may not have concidered
by Jed Boal

Many Utahns already have a 72-hour kit and a good emergency plan for family members in the event of an earthquake. But Joe Dougherty with the Utah Division of Emergency Management suggests some preparations you may not have considered.

Communication

If an earthquake rattles the Wasatch Front, you need to communicate with family right away. The best way to do so is to send a text. If everyone tries to call, that can jam up the phone lines.

Household concerns

Have an emergency toilet. You might not be able to use your toilet after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake, which would likely damage sewer and water lines. Buy a 5-gallon bucket and a special toilet seat lid to snap on top. Line the bucket with a garbage bag and throw in kitty litter between each use to reduce odors.

Secure your water heater. If your water heater gets knocked over in an earthquake and starts a fire, you’ve got another problem on your hands. Strapping the water heater to the wall will not only prevent a second disaster, but you can also use all the fresh water inside.

Conduct a “home hazard hunt.” This means going through your house and identifying heaving things that might fall down in an earthquake, and then finding a way to secure them.

Pets

A 72-hour emergency kit for your pet is important. Make sure it includes extra food, an unbreakable bowl, and a spare leash.

Email: jboal@ksl.com

Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=29516946#VpRZOZQo37Ij9sif.99

Posted by: rjones34 | March 19, 2014

10 Tips to Become a Wilderness Survivor

Check out this awesome article that I read in the news this morning! It is great to be reminded of these things as more people wander up into the mountains as the weather is getting warmer!Image

http://www.ksl.com/index.php?sid=29047931&nid=1288&title=10-tips-to-become-a-wilderness-survivor

Posted by: rjones34 | March 17, 2014

Spring Cleaning

When it is time to turn the clocks back, there are some other things that you should do twice a year!

my recommendations are

1. Check fire alarms to make sure the batteries are good

2. Go through car first aid kit and replace things that have been used/expired

3. Go through food storage and use up things that will expire in the next 6 months

These 3 simple things can really help you out if something happens!!

Here is a pretty picture of spring, to motivate you to get these things done!

Image

Posted by: rjones34 | February 14, 2014

Pack for Adventure

I decided to mix a few of my interests together and develop a kit that can help keep others safe! I carry these items with me whenever I hike or snowshoe (my 2 favorite mountain activities) and I want others to be able to do the same. It is unlikely that you will ever need to spend the night in the wilderness unplanned, but you never know when a band-aid, some paracord, or some tissues will come in handy! I know that they have for me many times.

Check out my site and buy a kit so that you can travel safely!

Pack for Adventure

ImageImage

This is the basic kit with all of its contents. The bag is only 8×10 in so it will fit into any pack that you take with you and look at everything that it includes! I have the fabric for a water resistant bag and as soon as I find the time, that will go into my shop as well.

Image

This is the mini-kit and this all fits into a 5 oz container. This has tinder, a whistle, a compass, paracord, duct tape, band-aids and matches. I am not trying to be over confident or pushy, but this kit should go with you everywhere!

Pack for Adventure and travel safe!!

Posted by: rjones34 | February 10, 2014

Avalanche Safety

Utah friends,

The mountains are dangerous right now!

There were at least 2 fatalities this weekend due to avalanches in Northern Utah. I was going to go snowshoeing, but decided against it because of all of the rain which causes the snow to be highly unsteady making it extremely dangerous. I decided to just take my dog and go to the local park within the city where most of the snow was melted and play it safe. 🙂

ImageImage

See the article below for the story on the devastating 2 fatalities…

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/02/10/two-die-utah-avalanches/5366773/

 

Posted by: rjones34 | May 23, 2013

Disasters Are Happening More And More Often!

This last week I have read several articles about the tornados in OK and I have decided that I am never moving to the Midwest!

It reminded me of the time that one of them happened in Salt Lake. This valley was never supposed to have a tornado; and yet the impossible happened. I did not really think much about it then, but do you know what this means? Anything can happen here! Think about it..  The only one that still seems nearly impossible would be a hurricane. At first I thought volcano could be listed on this list of impossibility, yet when Yellowstone explodes, it is expected that it will affect us here! hundreds of miles away. We live in a scary world and it only seems like disasters are happening more frequently.

Image

Just today I had 2 earthquake alerts of over 7.0 in the south pacific. Things are happening around the world that have never happened before. I have never received so many notifications as I have now.

You can sign up for these alerts through the USGS website. It is kinda neat to see all of the earthquakes happening around the world! You can also choose specific areas and specific magnitudes for which quakes you want to be alerted about.

Do you know what this means??

PREPARE YOURSELVES FOR ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING!!

Posted by: rjones34 | November 9, 2012

Earthquake in Guatemala

Earthquake in Guatemala

I had to call my Guatemala family last night to make sure they were okay. They were, but they definitely were scared!! Let’s pray for those in Guatemala, in those town that had homes destroyed. 

Posted by: rjones34 | November 2, 2012

Time to Fall Back

Sunday November 4th marks the end of Daylight Saving Time, so remember to turn your clocks back one hour before going to sleep Saturday night.It is also a good time of year to:
• Change the batteries in your smoke detector – 65% of home fire deaths occur in homes with no working smoke alarms
• Check the contents of your 72-hour kit. Make sure everything is up to date and still working correctly
• Put a winter emergency kit in your car. The cold, snow and ice are on their way – make sure you are prepared

For more tips visit the website:www.redcross.org

Posted by: rjones34 | November 1, 2012

Personal thoughts on Sandy

Sandy ended up being just as bad as it was predicted that it could be. I have been following the results of the storm religiously, and even this morning I saw destruction that was heartbreaking. At the moment CNN is reporting that the storm has taken 157 lives. That number has changed almost every time that I have checked. It is way too high though. I know that some of these deaths were unavoidable, but I cant help to wonder how many of them could have been saved through proper education and preparedness?

The storm brought all kinds of problems along with it including: flooding, high winds, power outages, fires, falling trees, storm surge, blizzards, ice and several other things that I am sure did not make it into the news. Disasters are unpredictable and anything is possible.

If a disaster like this was ever to happen in Utah, I want to be someone that caused lives to be saved. I am spending a lot of time and money on my education so that I can then motivate people to become prepared. The earthquake that is coming to Utah will not give a few days warning like they were able to have with Sandy. It will creep up on us and catch everyone by surprise. I hope that I can soon begin to educate others on the importance of preparedness.

Although I am saddened by the devastation, I believe that wide-spread disasters like this, that happen close to home, can act as the trigger for people wanting to prepare themselves. Their thoughts and prayers are for those who were affected so dramatically by a disaster and do not want that happening to themselves. Disasters cannot be avoided completely, but everything you prepare in advance, will likely put you in a better position for living post-disaster.

If you want to help with relief projects visit serve.org 

Posted by: rjones34 | October 29, 2012

This is real life- Preparedness.

Sandy gave us a few days of warning, meaning that everyone should have gotten out there and prepared.  I am praying for all the people and I am so glad that people are changing their habits. There has been a series of natural disasters along the east coast and more and more people are realizing that it is a good idea to prepare for the worst.

Red Cross Preparedness

Preparing for a power outage 

Older Posts »

Categories